Resveratrol
resveratrol_antioxidants
Resveratrol is an anti-oxidant compound commonly found in the skin of red grapes, as well as other plant sources. For hundreds of years, traditional forms of medicine have valued the skins of grapes for their anti-aging, life-extending properties.

In ancient Chinese medicine, resveratrol was an important element of Ko-jo-kon, an herbal medicine for treating cardiovascular diseases, as well as liver disorders.

While resveratrol exists in many plants and foods, such as the spruce, lily, eucalyptus tree, as well as the mulberry and peanut, this antioxidant is most abundant in the skin of grapes (particularly vitis vinifera, labrusca, and muscadine grapes). Commonly, per gram, the skin of red grapes contains 50-100 micrograms of resveratrol. While the best way to consume resveratrol is through drinking wine, supplements are also an option for individuals who do not, for whatever reason, want to consume alcohol.

Resveratrol is a substance that decays quickly, and is difficult to keep potent even in laboratories. That said, it can still be useful in pill form. Obviously, since wine has the highest level of resveratrol, one must exercise moderation in consumption of alcohol. Doctors recommend one glass per day, as alcohol can be addictive. Please contact you medical practitioner before adding a resveratrol supplement to your diet.

More on this topic is coming soon.

 
 

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